Dr. Paul Kuzel completed 13 years of post-secondary education which included an undergraduate degree in Pharmacology from the University of Alberta (U of A), and medical education/ residency at the U of A’s prestigious Dermatology Residency Training Program.

Dr. Kuzel received more than a dozen major academic, research and leadership awards and served as Chief Resident of the Dermatology residency program at the U of A. He also held the highest elected resident position with the Canadian Dermatology Association (CDA), serving as co-chair of the CDA’s Residents and Fellows Society. Dr. Kuzel is interested in research related to various forms of skin cancer including melanoma, as well as squamous cell and basal cell carcinoma. This research has led to numerous opportunities, such as penning peer-reviewed articles in journals and book chapters and presenting at dermatology gatherings across the world.

Dr. Kuzel has a strong interest in laser and aesthetic dermatology and has trained with some of North America’s foremost cosmetic dermatology experts in major centres including Southern California, New York and Boston. Dr. Kuzel thrives on helping his cosmetic patients achieve their aesthetic goals while delivering beautiful, natural-looking results.

Posts by Dr. Paul Kuzel

treatments

Dr. Paul Kuzel

Botox® is the New Black

Over the years, many new Botox® treatment areas and techniques have been developed for various cosmetic indications.

treatments

Dr. Paul Kuzel

Turn Back the Hands of Time with Temple Filler

As we age, our face loses volume in several key and characteristic places due to a complex interplay between our genetics, sun damage, and various environmental factors.

treatments

Dr. Paul Kuzel

The Filler Effect

As we age, our face naturally loses subcutaneous fat, causing facial muscles to work closer to the surface of the skin. Facial atrophy exacerbated by the effects of gravity, sun exposure and years of facial muscle movement take their toll on our physical appearance as fine lines, deep folds and volume loss or hollowing become more pronounced in the face.